How much do musicians and their road crew earn?

If you are curious as to how much money you could be earning from your music, producing other people’s music or working as part of the road crew you should check out the new study from Berklee College of Music, Music Careers in Dollars and Cents. Originally released in 2010, this revised study by the … Read more

The band road crew dilemma – work for less or lose the work?

A quick tip based on recent experience – do not be afraid to stick to your guns when setting a price for touring crew work.

If a potential client (artist manager, booking agent or musical director) says he cannot afford your price, you should not drop your daily rate just to get the tour. Dropping your price can make you appear desperate in the eyes of your client and also sets a precedent when trying to negotiate a contract in the future.

For example, say you are a FOH engineer and your rate is $250 a day. You are offered a 32 date tour andthe  bands management inform you they can pay no more than $175 a day. If you say ‘yes’ to this offer they will then  know that they can reasonably expect you to drop your price whenever they ask you in the future. That is not good for you. However, if you say ‘no’ you run the risk of losing 32 days of paid work. What should you do?

Read moreThe band road crew dilemma – work for less or lose the work?

error: I would prefer if you did not try to do that.